Lunch Counter Stools From Greensboro

A green and a salmon-colored stool from the F. W. Woolworth department store in Greensboro, North Carolina. The Greensboro sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests against racial segregation, which took place in 1960, primarily in the Woolworth store, (now the International Civil Rights Center and Museum), in Greensboro. Four African-American students - Ezell Blair Jr., David Richmond, Franklin McCain and Joseph McNeil - were refused service at the store's lunch counter when they each asked for a cup of coffee. They stayed until the store closed that night, and then went back to the North Carolina A&T University campus, where they recruited more students to join them the next morning. The protests led to the F. W. Woolworth Company removing its policy of segregation in the Southern United States. The back rest and frame of the seat are chrome plated metal. The back rest is made of a middle rail with two spindles attached to a top rail that curves to connect to the chair seat. The seat has a plywood bottom and is attached to an iron tube. The iron tube and chair have been inserted into a reproduction metal base. A manufacturer’s tag is stapled to the bottom of the seat. Artist Chicago Hardware Foundry Co.. (Photo by Heritage Art/Heritage Images via Getty Images)
A green and a salmon-colored stool from the F. W. Woolworth department store in Greensboro, North Carolina. The Greensboro sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests against racial segregation, which took place in 1960, primarily in the Woolworth store, (now the International Civil Rights Center and Museum), in Greensboro. Four African-American students - Ezell Blair Jr., David Richmond, Franklin McCain and Joseph McNeil - were refused service at the store's lunch counter when they each asked for a cup of coffee. They stayed until the store closed that night, and then went back to the North Carolina A&T University campus, where they recruited more students to join them the next morning. The protests led to the F. W. Woolworth Company removing its policy of segregation in the Southern United States. The back rest and frame of the seat are chrome plated metal. The back rest is made of a middle rail with two spindles attached to a top rail that curves to connect to the chair seat. The seat has a plywood bottom and is attached to an iron tube. The iron tube and chair have been inserted into a reproduction metal base. A manufacturer’s tag is stapled to the bottom of the seat. Artist Chicago Hardware Foundry Co.. (Photo by Heritage Art/Heritage Images via Getty Images)
Lunch Counter Stools From Greensboro
PURCHASE A LICENCE
How can I use this image?
475.00 €
EUR
Please note: images depicting historical events may contain themes, or have descriptions, that do not reflect current understanding. They are provided in a historical context. Learn more.

DETAILS

Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
Credit:
Heritage Images / Contributor
Editorial #:
1326282753
Collection:
Hulton Archive
Date created:
01 January, 1960
Upload date:
Licence type:
Release info:
Not released. More information
Source:
Hulton Archive
Object name:
2832497
Max file size:
5929 x 5919 px (50.20 x 50.11 cm) - 300 dpi - 3 MB